2 INSTANCES


There is a small hope that unique British races of the species—isolated from continental Europe 8,500 years ago—may prove unusually resistant to the blight.

During the 19th century, as global trade increased exponentially, so did the incidence of tree blights. In the early 20th century, after rich countries instituted biosecurity regimes, the growth rates slowed, and in America, at least until recently, remained fairly linear. But in Europe, around 1960, the infection rate picked up, very likely due to the trade-boosting effect of economic integration. This not only spread diseases around the continent itself. It also made the law-abiding countries of northern Europe, such as Britain, susceptible to the sloppier customs regimes of the continent’s southern fringe.

http://www.economist.com/news/britain/21580459-arboreal-confirmation-britain-european-country-european-problems-unquiet-woods?fsrc=rss|btn

Advertisements

A seven-acre section of woodland near Bickleigh belonging to farmer John Greenslade has been decimated by the disease, and a major programme to uproot and destroy affected trees is under way.

Mr Greenslade began planting Byway Woods 20 years ago and has won awards for it.

Thousands of mature, native ash trees are being dug up and burned after the devastating disease ash dieback was confirmed in Devon.

About 2,000 trees at Byway Farm near Tiverton are affected, according to the Forestry Commission.

This is the first confirmed case of the disease in mature, native trees in the region – another nine cases have been confirmed in young trees that have been recently planted at sites across Devon and Cornwall, including two sites on Dartmoor National Park, according to Forestry Commission figures.

Ben Jones, of the commission’s England plant protection team, said: “It appears that the affected trees had the disease when they were planted in 1996-97. It is concerning and we are continuing our investigations into how the spread had taken place and how far it has spread.”

http://www.westernmorningnews.co.uk/Trees-burned-infection-ash-dieback/story-19481835-detail/story.html

Ash dieback has been found in mature trees for the first time in Wales.

The infected trees were discovered in Ferryside, Carmarthenshire, by Natural Resources Wales (NRW) staff last week.

Until now the Chalara dieback in Wales had been confined to newly planted sites in trees from nurseries known to hold infected stock.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-22516757

More than 20,000 trees may have to be destroyed at Northern Ireland’s only Diamond Jubilee Wood.

They are ash trees planted only last year near Whitehead to mark the Queen’s Jubilee.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-22047873

AROUND 60 per cent of the UK’s ash woodlands infected by a fungus could be wiped out within a decade, a study by the University of Edinburgh shows.

Scientists estimated that 90 per cent of Britain’s 126 million ash trees will become infected, causing ash dieback.

Dr Dave Reay of the university’s school of geosciences, who conducted the research, said the loss of a large volume of trees by the wind-blown fungus, Chalara, could also aggravate the effects of climate change.

http://www.scotsman.com/the-scotsman/environment/fungus-could-kill-60-of-infected-ash-woodlands-by-2023-1-2905550

Rogue traders are targeting householders in Warwickshire in a scam where crooks are trying to cash in on a tree-killing disease.

Simon Cripwell, spokesman for Warwickshire County Council’s Trading Standards team, said: “Across the region there have been reports of unscrupulous tree surgeons using the recent national publicity given about ash dieback to misinform tree owners in order to carry out unnecessary work.

“Such work has often led to a cost to the owner and the unnecessary felling of trees. Any householder or landowner who is advised that he or she has a tree that is diseased or dangerous should seek a second opinion if they do not have the expertise themselves.

Next Page »