Scientists have sequenced the genome of a type of ash tree with resistance to the deadly fungal disease sweeping the UK.

The development could be the starting point for breeding a strain of ash to replace thousands expected to succumb to ash die-back in the next few years.

All the data is being put on a crowd sourcing website OpenAshDieBack to enable experts from around the world to help identify genes that might be connected to the trees’ ability to withstand the fungus.

These genes could then be part of a breeding programme for resistant trees.

The samples for the latest research came from so-called “tree 35”, a strain of ash from Denmark originally bred nearly 100 years ago, which has shown an ability to tolerate the fungal disease, when virtually all its Danish relatives were wiped out.

Prof Allan Downie of the John Innes Centre believes this genetic understanding of both the lethal fungal infection and the surviving strain could help fill the impending gap in the canopy.

“We’re trying to give nature a bit of a helping hand by identifying the right kind of (native) trees to do the appropriate crosses,” he said.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-22913111

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