The study analysed ash dieback damage on 16-to-22-year-old trees in Swedish orchards; their findings indicate that the disease is strongly genotypically controlled, meaning that it attacks ash trees that display the same or similar genetic properties. Furthermore, they discovered that there was scope for introducing breeding programmes to produce ash trees with greater resistance to infection.

One conclusion that can be drawn from this research is that there is an answer to the ash dieback problem. Through stringent breeding programmes of stronger clones, ash trees with greater resistance to the disease can grow, meaning a reduced risk of a Chalara fraxinea fungus outbreak. For now, governments must deal with this problem, but a sustainable plan for the future must be implemented imminently.

http://ec.europa.eu/research/infocentre/article_en.cfm?artid=28373&id=%2Fresearch%2Fheadlines%2Fnews%2Farticle_12_11_27_en.html&item=Infocentre

See also:

https://ashdieback.wordpress.com/2012/11/20/breeding-resistance-hope-for-the-threatened-ash-lars-goran-steiner-forestry-research-institute-of-sweden-19nov12/

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